Referee’s Bookshelf – True20 Adventure Roleplaying and True20 Companion

True20 is one of the many unexpected uses Green Ronin have put the OGL to. Having already made out like bandits with Mutants and Masterminds, their adaptation of the D20 rules to superhero games, Green Ronin originally developed True20 as the system for Blue Rose, an attempt to market tabletop RPGs to the romantic fantasy crowd – a portion of the fantasy market typically poorly-served in a gaming context. I don’t know whether Blue Rose made any headway in that section of the audience, but it did get a reaction in the tabletop RPG hobby – who soon began lobbying for a standalone version of the system without all that yucky kissing attached. The end result is the True20 core rulebook. In its first incarnation, this included a collection of sometimes interesting but generally not awe-inspiring campaign settings at the back, but in recent printings it has ditched these and instead includes the material which formerly made up the True20 Companion. Therefore, I’m going to review both here (skipping over the campaign settings, which I don’t personally have much interest in) since between them they cover the material which Green Ronin are presenting as being key, core material for the game.

So far as I can tell from the explanatory notes and from the general approach behind the design, the intent behind True20 was to provide a system which was somewhat more intuitive than 3.X Dungeons & Dragons but wasn’t so radically stripped on that you’d describe it as a “rules-light” game – I think the idea was that the audience they were going for with Blue Rose weren’t dyed-in-the-wool gamers, so they would benefit from a system which was intuitively easy to learn, but at the same time they also tended to be grown-ups and so didn’t necessarily need to have their hands held. I’ve not read Blue Rose, so I don’t know how the rules concepts were explained there, but I wouldn’t give someone the True20 core book as their first RPG myself; it’s a little too dense to be beginner-friendly, and I think designer Steve Kenson unconsciously assumes the reader has a little more familiarity with RPG conventions – and particularly the conventions of the OGL – than a complete beginner would necessarily have. (In particular, the explanation of how damage works feels confusingly brief and I’m fairly sure the accompanying roll summary and gameplay example are actually incorrect.)

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