Wrath & Glory and Other Warhammer 40,000 RPGs Disappear From DriveThruRPG

Despite its first wave of products coming out and its core rules being pretty solid as far as I was concerned, there’s been a concerning silence about Wrath & Glory. Aside from a few mentions in interviews, there wasn’t much emerging from the design team with respect to details of future products. The game’s standalone website was still up, though it’s a singularly crap effort – there’s no link to buy the game from, only the starter set is detailed, and the social media links go through to WordPress defaults – and all mention of the game seemed conspicuously absent from Ulisses North America’s front page. Rumours floated around about poor sales, though sales figures in the RPG industry are incredibly difficult to pin down.

Now, though, a much more concrete sign of trouble has emerged: without warning, all Wrath & Glory products have been pulled from DriveThruRPG, along with all the PDFs of the Fantasy Flight Games-era 40K RPGs which Ulisses Spiele had been given the rights to sell as part of their deal with Games Workshop. The products are still available in your library if you’ve purchased them already, and they still show up on searches – but you get an error if you click on those search results, so it’s no longer possible to buy the products on DriveThru if you haven’t already.

On doing further checks, other Ulisses North America game lines like The Dark Eye and Torg are unaffected, so it doesn’t look like this is a shift in policy on their part to shun DriveThruRPG (a bizarre choice since it’d mean walking out of the biggest shopfront in the market). Likewise, Rough Nights and Hard Days – the new supplement for WFRP – is still available on DriveThruRPG (and is doing pretty well in the sales rankings at that), so it seems unlikely that Games Workshop has abruptly decided to cancel all their RPG offerings or ban their licensees from using DriveThru. (Such a move would be a bit out of character for Games Workshop these days anyway, since under their new CEO they seem much more reasonable and gamer-friendly than they’ve been for a long while.)

On the whole, the situation stinks of a licensing issue between Games Workshop and Ulisses – extending, possibly, to a full-on cancellation or freezing of the licence. Why this would be the case I do not know; a lot hinges on what termination clauses and measures were written into the licence, and as a result it’s possible that this was initiated by Games Workshop, or by Ulisses, or by both.

It’s difficult to speculate what could have prompted this, but if I had to put bets on it, I’d say that some sort of acrimonious disagreement is involved. Compare this to the situation where Fantasy Flight gave up the licence voluntarily, and were able to declare as much to give customers a chance to make a last few purchases before the clock ran down. I can’t see that either Ulisses or Games Workshop would have wanted it to go down this way if they had a choice about it.

Possibly it’s just a momentary argument about royalties due from PDF sales or something of that nature, and PDF sales will be restored in due course… but it feels more likely that Wrath & Glory is dead in the water. Whether this came down to Ulisses tossing the 40K licence away (perhaps due to poor sales making it no longer worth their time, or their arrangement with Games Workshop constraining them from making other deals they thought would be more worthwhile), or down to Games Workshop slapping the franchise out of Ulisses’ hands, we don’t know. We can only hope that sooner or later someone else will step up to the plate to handle the grim darkness of the far future in tabletop RPG format.

UPDATE: It’s been announced that Ulisses are turning over development of Wrath & Glory to Cubicle 7. Cubicle 7 press release here, Ulisses statement here.

Despite Ulisses putting a brave face on this, I feel like this is mostly good news for Cubicle 7 and Games Workshop, and a bad sign for Ulisses North America. UNA lose a major brand, Games Workshop greatly simplify their oversight workload on the RPG front, and Cubicle 7 get all the Warhams RPGs under their banner. I have to suspect that Ulisses Spiele may feel that UNA has overextended itself and have decided to prune back their American branch accordingly.

Cubicle 7 confirm that there’ll be a revised printing of the core book, which I actually welcome – as much as I like the new system, the production values on the core book could do with a little Cubicle 7 magic, and folding in the errata would be a nice move.

Black Crusade: A Retrospective

Ulisses Spiele have landed the licence to do Warhammer 40,000 RPGs and announced Wrath and Glory, a “one core book with supplements exploring many options”-type RPG with a D6 dice pool system which feels like a very different approach to doing a 40K roleplaying game from the design philosophy that Black Industries pioneered and Fantasy Flight Games followed. As such, it feels like a good time to start a run of retrospectives of the previous generation of 40K RPGs, and where better than the most nonstandard and obviously self-contained of them? Dan’s wrapped up his Black Crusade campaign recently, so I’ve had a chance to get quite familiar with the exciting roleplaying game of black metal mayhem in the service of the Chaos gods.

Black Crusade

One notable thing about Black Crusade is that it is absolutely and 100% Fantasy Flight’s baby. Black Industries had originally planned 3 Warhammer 40.000 RPGs – Dark HeresyRogue Trader, and Deathwatch, with the intention that each of them would be mutually compatible. Of course, in one of their regular stinging slaps to the faces of gamers everywhere Games Workshop decided to shut down Black Industries more or less immediately after the release of Dark Heresy and its GM screen and Inquisitor’s Handbook; according to the intro in Black Crusade, the materials Fantasy Flight received from Black Industries constituted of the completed Black Industries products plus the notes for Disciples of the Dark Gods. We may never know whether it was due to contractual commitments or simply an admirable willingness to see Black Industries’ original vision fulfilled, but Fantasy Flight didn’t really tamper with the core system all that much for producing Rogue Trader and Deathwatch, resulting in a more or less entirely mutually-compatible line that, if it wasn’t exactly what Black Industries had intended, was at least about as close as anyone could have reasonably expected Black Industries to get to it.

Continue reading “Black Crusade: A Retrospective”