Pendragon (Sort of) Comes Home

So Chaosium have just announced that they’re partnering with Nocturnal Media, in order to provide assistance in marketing and distributing Pendragon and helping them with the fulfillment of various Kickstarters. The press release does not specify which Nocturnal Kickstarters are involved, but it seems a fair bet that one of them is Paladin, an adaptation of Pendragon to focus on the legends of Charlemagne.

This is a bit of a homecoming for Pendragon. Its first four editions were published through Chaosium – it was Greg Stafford’s pet project, Chaosium was Greg’s company, no-brainer, right? Right – until, that is, the late 1990s, when the collapse of the Mythos card game and associated tensions meant that Chaosium needed to trim the fat and Greg found himself wanting to disengage from the company and see about working with other publishers. (This is in part how we ended up with Mongoose and Design Mechanism publishing editions of RuneQuest before its return to Chaosium.)

As it happened, former West End Games designer Peter Corless, who had largely left the games industry to work at Cisco, fancied playing publisher as a bit of a side gig (and, presumably, was a big Pendragon fan). Corless had given Chaosium a substantial loan at one point to keep operating, which they had defaulted on; in order to make good, Corless accepted instead of payment on the loan the full rights to Pendragon. Setting up Green Knight Publishing, Corless kept the Pendragon flame alive when Chaosium might have otherwise neglected it, until in 2004 he sold the rights to White Wolf, who put the fifth edition (and the mighty, magnificent Great Pendragon Campaign) via their ArtHaus imprint.

Fast forward a bit to the end of White Wolf as we formerly knew it, with CCP buying out the company. Stewart Wieck eventually decided to leave White Wolf, the company he’d co-founded with Steve Wieck and Mark Rein-Hagen, to go it alone, so he made his farewells, picked up the rights to Pendragon (which White Wolf was at this point more or less no longer interested in), and set up Nocturnal Media to keep the flame alive, with Greg issuing further 5th Edition material through Nocturnal.

Som years later, Stewart undertook a brace of ambitious Kickstarters – ranging from revivals old Lion Rampant/early White Wolf ideas like Whimsy Cards and Storypath Cards to new variants of existing properties like Paladin to English translations of highly-regarded Spanish or French games like Aquelarre or Wurm. Unfortunately, before completing these projects Wieck died incredibly suddenly and unexpectedly.

That’s how we get to this current pass. As a backer of several of those projects, I can confirm that whilst progress has been happening, it’s been agonisingly slow. Why this is the case isn’t always particularly visible, but it’s become evident that Stewart didn’t exactly leave behind an especially clear and unambiguous action plan for getting the Kickstarters sorted. Things which had been believed to have been in hand weren’t, and stuff which had been promised ended up getting overlooked, and in general it’s been a bit of an awkward slog.

Chaosium getting involved sounds like a really positive step to me. Kickstarters which overrun have a way of becoming financial millstones around a publisher’s neck (because they budget for X amount of work and it turned out to take X+Y amount of work to actually get the job done), and when multiple projects are in place there’s a dangerous temptation to rob Peter to pay Paul, using the funds of one to get a different one finish in the hopes that the income stream from selling the project might cover the gap. I don’t know whether that’s the case here or how healthy Nocturnal’s finances are in general, but the aid of Chaosium in distributing and marketing Pendragon and associated materials is surely going to be a big help.

On top of that, it’s worth bearing in mind that the new regime at Chaosium – made up of the key players at Moon Design publications, one of the various producers of Glorantha material during Greg Stafford’s sojourn away from Chaosium – were brought in by Greg and Sandy Petersen in part to act as a crack team of Kickstarter troubleshooters. The major problem they were facing was taking the mess that the old Charlie Krank-led regime had made of the Horror On the Orient Express and Call of Cthulhu 7th Edition Kickstarters and untangling it, and they did a pretty fine job. If anyone has a track record of giving a troubled Kickstarter delivery process a much-needed shot in the arm, it’s them.

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