The Reading Canary: Fighting Fantasy (Part 7)

It’s time for another entry in my infrequent series of Fighting Fantasy gamebook reviews. This time around, we’re going to wrap up the rest of the series’ gamebooks from 1986. We’re now four years after the series has released, but there’s a sense that the early boom is beginning to plateau – six gamebooks were released in 1986 (two of which I reviewed in my previous article in this series), but that’s less than the 1985 peak (7 mainline gamebooks plus the final volume of Sorcery!), and the quality is starting to get a bit hit and miss.

This time around, I’m going to get to cover four gamebooks from four different authors, each of whom applies a different approach to their gamebook-writing craft. The main common factor is, as always, that in whatever the scenario is YOU are the hero…

Trial of Champions

Scenario

Ian Livingstone’s first Fighting Fantasy book since Temple of Terror is a sequel to Deathtrap Dungeon. Baron Sukumvit has redesigned his infamous dungeon and is offering his challenge once again. You have no intention of participating – but Lord Carnuss, the Baron’s good-for-nothing brother, has his eye on the prize purse! He therefore has kidnapped a range of warriors – including you – and sets them against each other in a grand elimination tournament until only one is left. The sole survivor will be Carnuss’ champion in the Deathtrap Dungeon challenge; should you survive, it is only by mastering Baron Sukimvit’s maze that you’ll have a chance to take down Lord Carnuss. There, nice and simple.


System

It’s vanilla, no-frills Fighting Fantasy, Ian having never really been one for rules tweaks.

Gear

He is, however, sometimes happy to make things harder for the player: this time you start with neither potion nor Provisions, arbitrarily increasing the difficulty that much further.

First Run

Skill: 10
Stamina:
 15
Luck:
 7

So, off we go to win Lord Carnuss’s little selection process so we can access the main part of the adventure, and – whoops! Died before we got to the end!

Folks, Carnuss’ arena nonsense is basically a filtering process to stop characters with poor stats from getting into the actual meat of the scenario this time. There is an unskippable fight against a Skill 10 opponent (and this is in a scenario where you don’t start out with Provisions or a potion, remember). I died somewhat later than this, in a blindfolded fight which asked me to make a bunch of Luck rolls, which I failed and so got killed. Ian often seems to forget – or just plain doesn’t care – that when you make Luck rolls in the Fighting Fantasy system your current score goes down, so it’s utter bullshit to ask for a bunch of Luck rolls in quick succession – all that will do is make it increasingly likely the player will fail. “Succeed a Luck roll or insta-die” is peak Ian and very infuriating.

I don’t know if you have to use Luck to beat that fight, so I’ll roll Stamina and Luck honestly for future runs, but to save myself a long series of runs where I just get shanked by my Skill 10 cellmate (whose illustration is unfortunately reminiscent of World War II anti-Japanese propaganda, yeesh), I’m just going to tweak the character generation rules: instead of rolling 1D6+6 for Skill, I’ll do 1D3+9 to give a range of 10-12.

Hey, Ian: see how fucking easy that was? You could have just amended the character generation process for this gamebook and started at the dungeon. I guess that wouldn’t be a cheap and easy way to eat up a bunch of paragraphs, though.

Second Run

Skill: 12
Stamina:
 20
Luck:
 7

And on this second run I got past Lord Carnuss’ selection tournament and actually got to go to the dungeon, then regretted it. It really feels like reheated leftovers from Deathtrap Dungeon, right down to bullshitty “choose which direction to go at the T-junction, you will lose if you make the wrong choice, and no I am not providing any useful information to help you make the choice” moments. I’m not playing through this shit honestly, sorry. There’s a fun bit at the end where Lord Carnuss tries to claim your prize by dint of you being his slave, and Baron Sukumvit instead lets you fight Carnuss to the death for some nice vengeance, but that’s not enough catharsis to get over the half-baked nonsense this gamebook throws at you.

Robot Commando

Scenario

Penned by the American Steve Jackson (the one of Steve Jackson Games, Munchkin, GURPS, and Fantasy Trip fame, not the Fighting Fantasy co-creator and Games Workshop co-founder), Robot Commando has a rather anime-esque concept – you can imagine a setting book for its world being put out for Mekton or Lancer. You live in Thalos, a colony on a far-off planet, and you work in one of Thalos’ famed dinosaur ranches. Robot technology is widely used on this world, and you are trained in using mecha in order to herd your dinos.

One day, however, Thalos is attacked by the Karosseans, inhabitants of a rival colony who have their own robot technology, who have softened Thalos up by invasion by using an airborne pathogen to induce a type of sleeping sickness. You happen to be one of the few residents of Thalos who has any immunity to the disease, so it falls to you to saddle up your best cowboy robot, ride out, and see what you can do to stop the invasion.

System

As well as the usual system for coming up with your own stats, the game also naturally has systems for modelling the various robots you can obtain over its course. Robots have Armour stats, Speed ranks, an associated combat modifier, and potentially additional special abilities. For robot combat, the Skill of whoever’s operating the robot is used as the base, modified by the combat modifier, which is a bonus or penalty (or flat zero) to your Skill that reflects how optimised for combat the robot is. Armour is basically used in place of Stamina. Speed is, obviously, a measure of how fast your robot is – and robots who are fighting slower robots enjoy a +1 bonus to the operator’s Skill to reflect the speed advantage.

It’s a quite elegant way of extrapolating the Fighting Fantasy system to include all this robot stuff and create clear distinctions between robot novels without excessively complicating system or diverting massively from its underlying principles, so that’s all good.

Gear

You start out with a sword and 5 medkits – which only heal one point of Stamina when you use them. This seems astonishingly stingy, considering that Provisions in standard Fighting Fantasy books typically heal 4 points of damage at a time, and by default successful attacks from foes do 2 points of damage, so I feel like this was either a mistake or American-Jackson being unnecessarily harsh.

First Run

Skill: 10
Stamina:
 18
Luck:
 12

I won the book on this run! Part of it may have been due to favourable stats, though I think it might be possible to get through the game with low stats if you are very combat-avoidant and make extensive use of the provision to escape most battles (a system feature which had been in Fighting Fantasy from early on, but which many writers either used only minimally or outright ignored). Another part of it is that American-Jackson does promise that there’s multiple routes through to defeating the invasion, and I happened to figure out one early on and effectively worked towards it.

Structurally, the adventure is quite interesting because you spend most of your time travelling between the various cities of Thalos, as you try to find a method of saving your people. Mapping the game largely entails figuring out this network of cities, because as you depart each one you only get the closest ones listed, and then noting which specific locations are available at each city.

In a nice touch, if you return to a particular city or sub-location a second time, odds are that Karossean forces have shown up, creating a new obstacle for you to evade or blast through in order to get to where you want to go, so the gamebook, which both creates an impetus to keep moving and going to new places unless you have a really good reason to revisit a place and helps create this sense of an invasion in progress and a land that’s becoming increasingly unsafe for you as a result of this invading force.

All this, plus you can pilot a robot and punch out a dinosaur. The only significant criticism I can make of Robot Commando is that some of the paragraph entries are a little bland and terse in style, but despite that the anime-influenced stylings of the concept still shone through. This was the last Fighting Fantasy book from American-Jackson, and I think it’s his absolute best contribution to the series, and a high water mark of Fighting Fantasy in its own right.

Masks of Mayhem

Scenario

Robin Waterfield’s Masks of Mayhem casts you as the ruler of Arion, a realm in the northeast of the continent of Khul. Your court wizard has warned you that Morgana, the sorceress of Krill Garnash, is up to a dreadful plot: she has been constructed a series of golems and bestowed upon each of them a mask inscribed with one of the twelve sigils that influence the fabric of the cosmos. So far she has eleven: once she has completed the twelfth, she will be unstoppable. For your court wizard to challenge her directly would risk a magical war even more destructive than her use of the golems – but he insists that your heart is pure enough to challenge her power. Thus, you must set forth to take her down.

This stinks of a trap, and it turns out to be a trap. In addition, despite being in theory the ruler of Arion, Masks of Mayhem never really does all that much to make you feel like you are an incognito noble, rather than any other generic Fighting Fantasy protagonist. Perhaps a bit more fleshing-out of the introduction would have helped – as it stands it’s pretty terse, though perhaps this is intentional to make sure the name of your court wizard – Ifor Tynin – stands out. Let’s see…

System and Gear

This is a book which follows what I call the “Livingstone Model” (by dint of Livingstone doing a run of books using it): the rules section describes a totally vanilla take on Fighting Fantasy system with no deviations, and your starting gear is the usual sword, leather armour, backpack, 10 provisions, and a choice of Skill, Stamina, or Luck-restoring potions.

First Run

Skill: 9
Stamina:
 20
Luck:
 11

I died at the end of this run for daft reasons, after dying a lot through cheap auto-kill situations which I decided to cheat and rewind from. Waterfield sprinkles on plenty of those, and also hard-codes the gamebook with an extremely precise “one true path” which offers little scope for deviation, which made me deeply disinclined to do any replays because it feels like too many of them would involve me playing to a certain point, realising I didn’t have the crucial items needed to progress, and then having to either cheat more badly than I already had on the first run or give up there knowing I’d already gone wrong.

This is frustrating because there’s stuff to like about Masks of Mayhem. When Waterfield puts his mind to it, he’s able to provide material which feels richer and more atmospheric than the somewhat flat material in his debut, Rebel Planet, and in some instances he’s able to implement some nice tweaks to the system to reflect interesting circumstances in combats, which helps stopping the combats from feeling samey.

However, along with the very finicky One True Path, the gamebook also includes an annoying number of unavoidable fights against high-skill opponents – Morgana herself is Skill 11. True, you can find a way to boost your original Skill score by 1, and there is an item which reduces the skill of many opponents by 1 if you are able to find it (and if you don’t have the item which allows you to trivially get it, there’s a nice tiger-hunt minigame to get an opportunity to earn it the hard way), but even then that might mean a player character with an effective Skill of 8 facing down Morgana with an effective skill of 10, and the way the bell curve works that means she has a decided advantage.

True, her Stamina is only 6 – but she has an effect on her which means each successful strike against her will only do 1 point of damage unless you successfully Test Your Luck to increase it to 2 (and generally speaking doing luck tests in Fighting Fantasy combat is something the gamebooks train you not to do, since it reduces your Luck score and makes you much more vulnerable to “test your Luck or die” situations – which this book includes). This means that she’s effectively Stamina 12, or at most effectively somewhere between Stamina 6 and 12 depending on how much weight you want to put on the “test Luck to boost damage” option, and I think such a creature will more often than not wipe the floor with a Skill 8 character, if such a character even survives to reach Morgana in the first place.

After you defeat Morgana, you can only survive if you had a conversation with the right NPC (and had the correct information and item needed to return from that conversation) earlier, at which point you have been warned about potential treachery, and you are instructed to turn to the paragraph which would come to mind if you have identified the traitor involved in Morgana’s dire plan. It’s Ifor Tynin of course, who was responsible for getting you to go personally on your quest in the first place.

Annoyingly, however, this is the sort of riddle where it’s very likely to get to an incorrect answer for entirely legitimate reasons. The actual answer here is “40”, because “Ifor Tynin”, but the answer you most likely arrive at is 149 – “I” for “1”, then the 40, then “nin” for “9”, so this is a just plain bad puzzle: it doesn’t unambiguously point to the correct paragraph and therefore it’s possible to “lose” the gamebook even if you get this puzzle technically right (by correctly guessing who the traitor is).

Between this and regular lapses into terser and less interesting prose, Masks of Mayhem feels incredibly uneven – frustratingly so, since it feels like it has the potential to be much better with more polish. In addition, the golems end up being a complete damp squib: they turn up briefly at the end, at which point they either insta-kill you or you mop the floor with them provided you encountered the spectral army who will help you fight them and didn’t waste your opportunity to summon them by wasting it on a stupid “gotcha” option (by merely asking a question about Galrin, the leader of the army, this is taken you as deliberately triggering their appearance, at which point they spontaneously appear and massacre the elf village you were at, because apparently Galrin is a big goof who can’t tell the difference between him being mentioned in conversation and a specific summons).

This means that the titular Mask of Mayhem – and the golems who bear them – have been hyped up only to do almost nothing in the actual adventure. It would be more fun if the golems were out and active from the start, with you encountering them and having to face their individual powers based on their sigils over the course of your journey. As it is, it feels like an arbitrary figleaf put over the adventure, which could be arbitrarily changed without really changing the structure of the gamebook at all.

Creature of Havoc

Scenario

Steve Jackson’s final Fighting Fantasy gamebook – yes, the British Steve Jackson, the Games Workshop one, of the original co-creators only Ian Livingstone would occasionally return to the writing mines after this – goes ambitious with its scenario, offering 20 pages of fairly dense setting background before the adventure actually begins. This information not only fills in many of the locations and factions of the gamebook’s setting – the Trolltooth Pass – but also reveals it to be the third in a trilogy.

You see, the thread weaving through the background material is the rise of one Zharradan Marr, who once upon a time was apprenticed to Volgera Darkstorm, a powerful wizard. Marr and his fellow apprentices, Zagor and Balthus Dire, became allies in the pursuit of dark magic and styled themselves the Demonic Three; slaying Darkstorm and plundering his treasures, they each set off to make their own way in the world. Zagor and Balthus Dire were the big bads of The Warlock of Firetop Mountain and Citadel of Chaos respectively, now in Creature of Havoc Marr is clearly the big bad.

He has the right background for it: Marr hails from Dree, a village ruled over by a clique of witches who are obsessed with a sinister brand of magical transplantation which allows them to turn ordinary people into hideous mutants. He has tricked his way into obtaining the bottles containing the Vapours of the Rainbow Pool – gaseous spirits born of the union of elven queens and their patron gods. He has stolen the Galleykeep, a fabulous flying ship. And, riding the Galleykeep, he intends to find the hidden elven queendom in the Forest of Spiders that the Vapours hail from, so that he may force them to give up the secrets of commanding the Vapours.

But what do you care? You are a ravening, hideous monster who lives in a dungeon. Why would you even think about these matters?

Yes, this is the infamous “you play a monster” Fighting Fantasy book. There’s some plot stuff explaining why, and some system quirks in the early phases of the adventure, but I’ll get into that when I get into playing the game itself.

System

At least in terms of what’s presented in the front, this is still the bog standard Fighting Fantasy system, except Jackson gives you one edge: to represent the fact that you are a super-tough monstrosity, if you roll doubles on an attack roll, then you auto-kill your opponent, no need to resolve the rest of the attack round. Since there’s six ways to roll doubles on 2D6 and 36 possible roll outcomes, this means you’re auto-killing foes in on average 1 in 6 combat rounds, but frankly that’s fine – it speeds up combat and gives a useful edge to the player, and crucially it means it’s worth playing through a fight even if the Skill disparity is such that you’re deeply unlikely to get a conventional win because you might luck out and survive anyway. Many Fighting Fantasy gamebooks would be improved if they implemented at least a version of this rule – witness how often my runs in these articles have been derailed because I rolled a Skill of 7 and I ended up in an unavoidable fight with an opponent of Skill 12.

Gear

Since you are a witless monster at the start of the adventure, you carry no gear to start out with.

First Run

Skill: 11
Stamina:
 20
Luck:
 8

So, Creature of Havoc has a very infamous schtick in its early sections: because you are a mindless monster, you only rarely get a chance to actually choose what you are going to do, and indeed most decisions are instead based on dice rolls. This is a funny idea at first, but, it’s less funny when it leads to autokill situations. Take this run, where after enjoyably tearing a hobbit and a knight to pieces I got enslaved by a wizard using a Control Creature spell, because I rolled to focus on the knight over the wizard and therefore couldn’t stop him using the spell.

The problem with this is that to solve a Fighting Fantasy book, you need to be able to make different choices the next time you play so you can figure out where you are going wrong and correct for it. In Creature of Havoc, that is no longer the case. If you refuse to cheat, then you can end up having runs where you learn absolutely nothing new or useful, because the roll of the dice directs you into an autokill situation without steering you anywhere you haven’t gone before. Even worse, if you’ve comprehensively solved the early stretches of the book and know exactly what you need to do, you can still get screwed on a run and have to start over!

This is yet another example of a Fighting Fantasy gamebook creating a situation where cheating is a just plain better experience than playing the game honestly, which is the opposite of good game design. It’s a serious, major flaw in the book, and therefore on future runs I am going to allow myself limited cheating: namely, I’ll allow myself to pick rather than rolling in a situation where getting the right roll will allow me to do something I’ve not done before or go somewhere I’ve not been before on a previous run.

Once I get to the point where I am fairly confident I know what I need to do in the early game, I will ignore the randomisation of choices entirely. The book assures me that there will come a point where I get free choice, once I figure out where that is I refuse to be corralled into playing runs where I don’t actually get to make any meaningful decisions; as interesting as an experiment with the gamebook format the randomisation is, I think the results of the experiment demonstrate why the idea should never, ever be repeated, and perhaps should have been left on the cutting room floor altogether.

Another schtick has all the dialogue be garbled (specifically, encoded), so you can’t work out what’s being said at first. Whilst I could try various brute-force methods to decipher the dialogue, I think I will hold off for now and see if a key is provided at some point later in the book.

Second Run

Skill: 7
Stamina:
 18
Luck:
 10

This time around I got to the same adventuring party, but killed the hobbit fast enough that my decision of who to target next was not based on a flat D6 roll, but on a Luck test – and since your Luck is going to start out at 7 or better, this means you have better than even odds of going for the wizard. This at least demonstrates that your initial character generation rolls have some effect in this early phase of the game, even if actual decision-making doesn’t (though it does mean I will also have to cheat on that Luck roll in future to avoid annoying early insta-kills).

I got a bit further this time and then got killed by a trio of stealthy flesh-feeders. That’s low-Skill for you (and I was especially unlucky in that I didn’t roll a single double during the fight, meaning my autokill power never activated).

Third Run

Skill: 10
Stamina:
 15
Luck:
 11

This is an example of just how arbitrary the early stretches of this gamebook are: in this run, I was shot dead by a dark elf. Curious, I cheated a little and checked some alternate paragraphs and established that, yes, if you take the turning that leads eventually to the dark elf you inevitably encounter them, and they inevitably kill you. You’re basically dead as soon as you roll 4-6 at the particular turn-off which leads you in that direction.

Fourth Run

Skill: 9
Stamina:
 14
Luck:
 9

Scratch that: you are dead if you even get to the junction I mentioned last time. If you hit the Clawbeast’s room and survive the fight there, you have (if you don’t cheat) a 1 in 2 chance of just plain auto-dying by not taking the exit which takes you west – and since that takes you to the same place you would have gone anyway if you’d not gone to the Clawbeast’s room, that means that visiting the Clawbeast is at best a pointless detour which gives you no benefit, at worst a highway to death. So at least I can steer away from the Clawbeast in later runs.

Fifth Run

Skill: 10
Stamina:
 20
Luck:
 9

On this run three things became apparent:

  • Hobbits are tasty and delicious, they are my favourite food.
  • I’m probably failing to find the thing which lets you decode speech and writing, because I am encountering a lot of it.
  • Jackson is a sadist who sees nothing wrong with putting infinite loops into his gamebooks (in this case, an infinite loop of respawning Chaos Warriors.

I suspect I am going to need to find the means of translating stuff if I am going to make much further progress.

Sixth Run

Skill: 10
Stamina:
 19
Luck:
 11

I managed to find the vapour that bestows understanding of language upon you this time, which is good, but I died because I hadn’t found the item which lets you find secret doors which I found last time, which is bad. Even worse, I went in opposite directions at one points so I am not sure how to get the knowledge potion on the same playthrough as getting the secret door-finding pendant.

(Incidentally, apparently pre-2002 printings of the book have a bug: one of the paragraphs which should let you unlock secret doors didn’t have the crucial key-phrase at the start of it, thereby failing to signal to you that you can in fact do it. This has been amended.)

Still, this is progress of a sort. The code in question is explained in a rather terse fashion and I suspect many kids playing this in the pre-Internet era may have been thoroughly stumped trying to parse out the rather awkward explanation; providing a worked example in the paragraph in question would have been friendly. Still, I can now use this knowledge to do stuff like decode stuff, and once you get the knack of how the code works, you may find it’s viable to decode things by eye rather than needing to write stuff down (though this will vary from player to player obviously).

This allows me to decode the hide I took from the dwarf you kill at the start of the adventure, which confirms that I am indeed in Zharradan Marr’s dungeon. Security seems lax here, I keep running into adventuring parties who are trying to retrieve the Vapours, and now I’ve freed two of the Vapours and gained their blessings. Neat!

I’m feeling confident for future playthroughs, now I know where several crucial items are. Now I know the code I can even semi-cheat and read the dialogue that comes up before you acquire language – I say “semi-cheat” because on the one hand, I shouldn’t be able to understand the stuff if I haven’t yet received the gift of language, but on the other hand if Jackson is going to present me with dialogue before I in-character have the means to understand it, he must semi-expect me to cheat – an instance of him being poisoned by the same attitude Livingstone had of “players are going to cheat anyway, so why bother making a game which is fun to play if you don’t cheat?”

Seventh Run

Skill: 12
Stamina:
 19
Luck:
 11

I cheated anyway on this run.

Mostly that’s because I successfully got out of Marr’s dungeon, which takes up more or less the first half of the adventure and is very tricky; Jackson was following the “only one true path” school of thought here, and so getting out of the dungeon is difficult. Getting out and having acquired and done (and kept) the correct items needed to actually beat the gamebook is a nightmare – you can go all the way to the end only to find that you lose because you didn’t pick up a particular item in one room right at the start of the gamebook.

In addition, to win you have to undertake a particular quest, then choose the correct cardinal direction to travel in order to progress that quest (with no clues offered as to which way is the correct one to start out with), and then think to leave a village as soon as you enter it rather than exploring either of the shops available. There are also a bunch of highly arbitrary succeed-a-luck-roll-or-die situations which, to the extent that I can ascertain, are unavoidable.

Believe it or not, I still have some fondness for Creature of Havoc, but that’s mostly because Jackson is a much more flavourful writer than Ian Livingstone, and as a result even when he’s doing arbitrary bullshit it’s at least entertainingly arbitrary. Furthermore, even when you end up screwed, Jackson is at least a little better at establishing why you are screwed, giving you more of a chance to course-correct on future runs. Nonetheless, the number of playthroughs needed to beat Creature of Havoc fairly is, unless you are very lucky, likely to be much more than your patience allows for – especially since if you don’t cheat you’ll likely spend a bunch of runs dying off before you even unlock the capacity to choose in the early game.

Fundamentally, doing repeated runs with the book gets boringly repetitive after long enough, and the design of the book near-guarantees that a large number of repeated runs is necessary. It’s a cool avant-garde experimental concept for a gamebook, but the most experimental parts of the game are also the bits which are the most tiresome in practice. The thing I like most about it is its dark tone, something which Jackson had obviously pioneered in House of Hell but had also applied in a fantasy context (and in a much less frustrating and more rewarding way) in parts of Sorcery!; the best Fighting Fantasy books of the latter half of the Puffin run tended to be those which leaned into that horror-fantasy hybrid which tonally speaking has a lot in common with WFRP, even if Jackson himself wasn’t personally involved in that particular Games Workshop endeavour on the creative side.

On balance, Creature of Chaos is about as frustrating as a Fighting Fantasy gamebook can be whilst still being a keeper for me, but I would put it right at the bottom of the “recommended” category – it’s worth a go just to see the experiment in action, but odds are you’ll get tired of its quirks and cheat sooner or later.

The Canary Says

I’d mentioned last time that I thought that the Fighting Fantasy series started running into quality control issues here, and that 50-50 hit/miss ratio continues here. Again, the two Steve Jacksons do the best books, but UK-Steve’s Creature of Havoc barely gets a passing grade, which is surprising given the high quality of his work preceding this (though that said, both Starship Traveller and Citadel of Chaos are clunkers). I think it’s a side-effect of Steve being much more keen to experiment with the format than Ian was – a quality which was great when the experiment worked out, but carried the risk of the experiment misfiring.

Perhaps Steve never did another gamebook after this because he simply was never inspired to – he’d done all the experiments with genre and format he felt inclined to do in the gamebook format and wanted to move on to pastures new. Of course, since Puffin were putting Steve and Ian’s names on the front covers of all the Fighting Fantasy books by other hands, it’s not like his name recognition would tail off any time soon – especially when the series would keep chugging on for dozens more books yet…

As usual, here’s my rundown of the books covered so far and how I rate them quality-wise.

----------------------------------------
Appointment With F.E.A.R.              😀 (Sheer delight)
                                       |
House of Hell                          |
                                       |
Sorcery!*                              |
                                       |
The Warlock of Firetop Mountain        |
                                       |
Robot Commando                         |
                                       |
The Rings of Kether                    |
                                       |
Island of the Lizard King              |
----------------------------------------
Space Assassin                         🙂 (Recommended)
                                       |
City of Thieves                        |
                                       |
Seas of Blood                          |
                                       |
Talisman of Death                      |
                                       |
Freeway Fighter                        |
                                       |
Demons of the Deep                     |
                                       |
Creature of Havoc                      |
----------------------------------------
Forest of Doom                         :S (Collectors only)
                                       |
Temple of Terror                       |
                                       |
Citadel of Chaos                       |
                                       |
Sword of the Samurai                   |
                                       |
Rebel Planet                           |
----------------------------------------
Caverns of the Snow Witch              😦 (Downright bad)
                                       |
Masks of Mayhem                        |
                                       |
Starship Traveller                     |
----------------------------------------
Deathtrap Dungeon                     😡 (Pissed me off)
                                       |
Trial of Champions                     |
----------------------------------------
Scorpion Swamp                         D: (OH GOD WHY)
----------------------------------------

* Assuming that you:
- play it as a wizard
- play the books in sequence
- and take then end of each book as a "save point".

3 thoughts on “The Reading Canary: Fighting Fantasy (Part 7)

  1. Pingback: The Reading Canary: Fighting Fantasy (Part 8) – Refereeing and Reflection

  2. Pingback: The Reading Canary: Fighting Fantasy (Part 9) – Refereeing and Reflection

  3. Pingback: The Reading Canary: Fighting Fantasy (Part 10) – Refereeing and Reflection

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