Expanding the Boundaries of the Art of Magic

So, in my ploughing through the various Ars Magica supplements on offer I’ve come to what I think of as the “expanded magic” supplement. These are supplements which add onto or provide alternatives to the Hermetic magic system as provided in the core rulebook; this includes hidden secrets possessed by the Order of Hermes, lost magics as yet unknown to the Order, hedge magics belonging to lone practitioners and small groups here and there, and a few types of magic which may pose an actual danger to the Order’s monopoly…

The Mysteries, Revised Edition

Updating the original 4th edition supplement, The Mysteries is built around the idea of mystery cults but isn’t exclusively devoted to them; rather, the titular Mysteries constitute a range of magical techniques that have not entirely been folded into the mainstream of Hermetic magic, but are practiced by individuals and groups within the Order of Hermes, either within the established Mystery Houses, or cross-House Mystery Cults, or as areas of obscure knowledge that are widely experimented with but aren’t part of the “core curriculum” (these latter “curious common magics” get an entire chapter filling you in on them). The book therefore mixes in both accounts of how these specialist magics work and details of groups dabbling in them, and rounds itself off with a chapter of additional Mystery Cults to round things off (along with an appendix on immortal magi).

Implementing all of these ideas in one campaign would, frankly, be incredibly difficult; however, the basic idea of new forms of magic which allow you to accomplish things not allowed for by the Hermetic magics in the core rulebook and which player characters can try to track down is a sound one. (It provided the basis of several other supplements in this vein, after all.) What puts these Mysteries aside from, say, the sort of magic outlined in Ancient MagicHedge Magic, and Rival Magic is that they are varieties of magic which, thanks to their association with Mystery Cults and Houses within the Order, helps get player characters seeking them out to engage with and become entangled in the politics of the Order of Hermes by virtue of needing to track down and gain the trust of individuals within the groups in question to obtain them.

The book is also, of course, a natural companion to Houses of Hermes: Mystery Cults, and indeed there’s some bits in here like Hermetic Architecture which you will want to have handy to get the most of some of the Houses outlined in there. I suppose this is why The Mysteries is listed as a core supplement on the Atlas website; between this factor and the way the book covers little miscellanea which aren’t offered in the main rulebook, it provides a really dense set of options for Ars Magica which a whole swathe of other books build on.

Ancient Magic

Ancient Magic offers a range of varieties of magic which have either entirely or are right on the brink of extinction. (The language of Adam, for instance, has at least one speaker still living – unfortunately, it’s Cain, who for this post-White Wolf iteration of the setting isn’t the first vampire but could very easily be reskinned as a vampire if you really wanted.) Thus, there’s an extent to which it’s another selection of little magics which are a bit more simple and narrower than the main magic system, but the method by which PCs obtain them are different; PCs have to go out into the world and explore to track down their last remnants, and then undertake extensive study to reframe them in Hermetic terms. There’s a fairly diverse range of magics on offer, but unlike The Mysteries it may be a little trickier to work these in; whereas it’s reasonably easy to work in a Mystery technique in any campaign where the PCs are regularly interacting with Order of Hermes types, Ancient Magic will often not come up unless the PCs actively have a reason to go looking for it, though then again an Ars Magica party which doesn’t include at least one lorehound eager to hare off after long-lost wisdom would be an unusual one.

Hedge Magic

Naturally especially useful for campaigns where House Ex Miscellanea is a big deal, Hedge Magic covers varieties of magic which are still practiced by small groups here and there outside of the context of the Order of Hermes typically, but which can be folded into the Order’s practices under the right circumstances. (In particular, a practitioner of hedge magic isn’t necessarily Gifted, which means the Order puts less of a priority on putting the “Join Or Die” ultimatum to them than they would for Gifted individuals.)

The types of magic on offer range from types which feel like perfect fits for Ars Magica – folk witchcraft and Viking-style rune magic – to varieties which I don’t think work quite as well. Elementalists, for instance, don’t feel like they really fill any niche than a Hermetic mage working largely with Aquam, Terram, Auram or Ignem wouldn’t fill, and likewise I’m not sure there’s much conceptual space in between the various types of “Learned Magic” and the scholarly Hermetic magic of the Order of Hermes.

Rival Magic

The final member of the quartet presents a clutch of different magical groupings which each, in their own way, could conceivably become an existential threat to the Order of Hermes. Neatly, the designers make sure that none of these varieties of magic are quite as flexible as Hermetic magic, and crucially the Order’s possession of Parma Magica provides, at least in the baseline default setting, a crucial advantage. Of course, this does mean that protecting the Parma Magica is all the more important…

Of all the supplements in question, this is the one which I think merited going last – not because it’s bad, so much as it’s a niche application. Any particular Ars Magica campaign is quite likely to involve wizards going after lost magic or delving into the mysteries of the Order, and anything which helps give a bit of colour to House Ex Miscellanea can only be a good thing, but whilst many referees may find it interesting to pit their players against a potential rival society of magicians, in other campaigns the subject will never come up. Furthermore, most of the varieties of rival magic here are quite regional, so it may be difficult to shoehorn some into particular campaigns. Still, the options are nice to have.

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