Referee’s Bookshelf: Traveller Supplement 12: Dynasty

As part of the process of finding stuff to put on this blog, I’ve decided to start reviewing bits and bobs from my RPG collection. The point of this effort is twofold: firstly, to assess whether I really need the book in question, and secondly to see how referees might us it in their campaigns.

Continuing the grand old tradition of nigh-featureless Traveller covers.

This is the twelfth supplement of Mongoose Publishing’s Traveller line. Twelve supplements into a game line’s existence – especially when you consider that that count doesn’t include the advanced career books, generic adventures, and game setting-specific material (Third ImperiumTraveller: 2300 ADJudge Dredd, etc.) that Mongoose have published for the game – and you’re already hitting the stage where you’ve thinking “well, they really have published an awful lot of stuff for this game line, and do we really need more generic supplements for the game at this point?” Indeed, except for a revised version of the original, flawed vehicle books which came out in 2012, Mongoose haven’t released a new core supplement for Traveller since Dynasty came out in 2012.

Most of the “core supplements” produced for Traveller are fairly dry affairs – stats for fairly generic spaceships and vehicles and equipment and so forth which GMs can use to populate their Traveller universes with if they don’t have the time or inclination to stat everything out by hand. However, towards the end of the supplement line Mongoose seem to have had allowed their authors to experiment a little, with rather mixed results. Cybernetics was essentially a stealth conversion of Traveller from a hard-ish space opera game to a cyberpunk game, which I really want to look into integrating into my current campaign more; August Hahn’s Campaign Guide was a quixotic attempt to provide a GMless and/or solitaire mode of play for Traveller which seems to have had a bit of a mixed reception.

And then you have Dynasty. This is the brainchild of Bryan Steele, one of the more reliable of Mongoose’s Traveller writers, and whilst I’m not aware of him going into detail about where he got the idea I mildly suspect that he might have been paying attention to Greg Stolze’s Reign, since much like Reign the supplement seeks to tackle the management of large organisations in an RPG context.

Specifically, Dynasty is designed to support a whole new layer of play which Traveller to date hasn’t given much support to. Dynasties, as the supplement defines them, are powerful organisations – religions, corporations, governments, organised crime syndicates, that sort of thing – existing within a Traveller universe. The supplement provides means of modelling them in the Traveller system, tracing their actions and interactions, and – most importantly – highlights ways in which the interaction of Dynasties can give rise to opportunities for interesting roleplaying adventures.

As with Reign, the process of supporting this requires Steele to effectively come up with an entirely new character creation and task resolution system designed for characters who are not individual human beings, but are substantial organisations in their own right. The extra wrinkle here is that to make any sort of sense as a Traveller supplement, rather than a standalone game, the supplement needs to make use of those of the Traveller rules which are useful for this purpose (not much, as it turns out, except for the basic task resolution system) and also provide rules which feel that they fit into the general design logic of Mongoose Traveller.

By and large, the supplement succeeds at this. Although so far as I am aware there is no precedent for these sorts of rules in Traveller, they feel like a natural extension to the system rather than something artificial being grafted onto it. By focusing, much like Reign‘s group command rules, on wide-scale strategic systems rather than the fine details of tactics, Steele keeps the focus of things firmly on creating opportunities for interesting Traveller scenarios, and indeed one of the options for creating a Dynasty is through a party of Traveller characters from a conventional campaign amassing enough resources and power to found a lasting power (though the skill requirements of this option are rather extreme, which makes me suspect that Steele has forgotten how slow skill training in Traveller is – personally, I’d be inclined to waive the skill requirements on the basis that a party who’s amassed enough money to found a Dynasty can just hire people with the appropriate skills).

This is what I think is one of the real strengths of Dynasty: it’s one of those rulebooks which really gets your gears turning and inspires all sorts of potential campaign ideas. You can have a Traveller campaign which begins conventionally and builds up to the PCs founding a Dynasty, or a game which kicks off with the players designing a Dynasty and with roleplaying scenarios arising from the Dynasty’s activities (there’s some nice rules which modify character generation based on the attributes and nature of a Dynasty, to allow you to make a group of PCs tailored to that Dynasty), or if a Dynasty-based campaign sees the player’s Dynasty crashing and burning you can revert to a conventional Traveller campaign with the players playing a rag-tag group of survivors of the collapsed Dynasty, or you can have a game where each player controls a rival Dynasty, or you can use Dynasty to handle the affairs of major powers behind the scenes in a campaign, or you could run a large organised play event with the refereeing team using Dynasty to handle downtime actions, and so on and so on.

I’ve not had a chance to test out Dynasty in my own Traveller campaign yet, so I can’t say how robust the system is, but it occurs to me that this is the sort of supplement where it doesn’t matter whether the rules are actually well-balanced or not-broken provided that they throw out interesting results, and that certainly seems to be the case.

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One thought on “Referee’s Bookshelf: Traveller Supplement 12: Dynasty

  1. Pingback: The Utilitarian Mongoose – Refereeing and Reflection

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